Friday, August 23, 2019

rsync over ssh // fastest options

rsync -aHxv --numeric-ids --delete --progress -e "ssh -T -c arcfour -o Compression=no -x" source_dir [email protected]:dest_dir

This command is almost exactly what somaddict suggested on commandlinefu.com.

(Source)

Saturday, June 15, 2019

Game Engines



Also: Trello / HacknPlan for management

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

My youtube-dl configuration / useful options

Here's my youtube-dl configuration (details about where to place the config-file below are here).
Of course you can also use any of these options in the command-line, without creating a dedicated config-file.


###############################################################
# This writes the video-IDs of the videos that have been downloaded
# into a file called archive.txt. Subsequent runs of youtube-dl will
# check that file and will skip videos that have already been downloaded.
--download-archive archive.txt

# Download subtitles in English, German, French and Amharic (if available)
# Note that these refer to human-generated subtitles (for example if
# the video-creator wrote them).
--write-sub --sub-lang en,de,fr,am

# Download subtitles in English, German, French and Amharic (if available)
# Note that these refer to Youtube's auto-generated subtitles (which can
# be hit or miss, but it's better than nothing, especially for English).
--write-auto-sub --sub-lang en,de,fr,am

# Get the best video quality available, but only up to 1080p.
# (with 4K videos, you'll end up with HUGE files, which one may
# want to avoid
-f 'bestvideo[height<=1080]+bestaudio/best[height<=1080]'

###############################################################
When downloading a playlist, I find it convenient to have the files with the playlist-order in the filename, since that's the way I like to sort them. To change the filename-template, use the "-o" option. For example, if this is what I want the 3rd song's filename in my playlist to look like:
3_NiceVideo_VideoID.mp4
This command will accomplish that:
youtube-dl -o "%(playlist_index)s_%(title)s_%(id)s.%(ext)s" 
For more info on output-templates (the stuff behind the "-o", read more here). Just in case someone finds this useful: Here's a web-based subtitle-scraper for YouTube: https://www.diycaptions.com/ And in the unlikely case one would want to download comments from a video, I haven't found a way to do this through the command-line. But I found this web-based-commend-scraper which seems to work fine: http://ytcomments.klostermann.ca/

Saturday, November 3, 2018

Men's popular hairstyles

Found some illustrations for popular men's hairstyles here and here.

Conversion chart pints/cups/quarts/etc.



[source]

Friday, December 30, 2016

How to mass-delete forwarders in cPanel

Here you go.

How to force Gmail to check your POP3 account as often as possible

I need Gmail to check some POP3 mailboxes as often as possible for a while, the info from this article worked great.

Saturday, May 7, 2016

Ubuntu: Root filesystem full? Try deleting old kernel images

I ran out of space on my root-partition today and was stumped for a second.

This command was useful to find out where the space was being used:
cd /
sudo du -sh * .
Then I found out Ubuntu doesn't delete old kernel images (which can take up several GBs over time) automatically, one has to do this manually. Here's how:

First, run these commands to do some maintenance / cleanup:
sudo apt-get autoremove --purge
sudo apt-get autoclean
sudo apt-get clean
There are several ways to find out all installed kernel image versions and delete them, but I chose to go with this one, because it seemed to be the most straight-forward and the least prone to error:

Install "synaptic":
sudo apt-get install synaptic
Find out your current kernel version:
uname -r
This is your current version, which you DO NOT (!) want to uninstall.

Then start Synaptic.

In the "Quick filter", type "linux-image".
That will show a list of all packages which match that name, among which are several named like this: "linux-image-X.XX...". Highlight all the older versions (be careful NOT TO select your currently installed version), then right-click and select "Mark for complete removal". It will ask you if you also want to remove packages associated with these. Yes, you do. Then hit "Apply".

This will take a while, depending on how many old kernels you have installed. On my system, about 8 GB of space was freed after this.

Once that's done, enter "linux-header" in the quick-filter and repeat the procedure. Again, be careful not to remove your current kernel-version. On my system, about 3 GBs of space were freed after this.

Source